Canada continues wind energy growth


Canada continues wind energy growth

 Canada meets wind energy milestone

 

In 2016 alone, Canada added 702MW of new wind energy capacity through 21 projects located in Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec.

 

These projects bring the total capacity to 11,898MW, which can supply 6% of the country’s energy demands for the year (roughly 3 million households).

 

According to CanWEA here are some key facts about wind energy in Canada:

 

• Ontario continued to lead Canada in market size and growth, adding 413 MW of new wind energy capacity in 2016 to bring its total installed capacity to 4,781 MW.
• Quebec added three projects totalling 249 MW of capacity in 2016, ending the year with 3,510 MW of wind energy on its grid and maintaining its position as the second largest wind energy market in Canada.
• Nova Scotia installed more wind energy projects than any other province in 2016, with 10 new facilities totalling 39.5 MW coming on line, most driven by the province’s unique community feed-in tariff program. Nova Scotia ended the year with 579 MW of wind energy capacity, placing it fourth among the provinces for total installed capacity.
• Canada’s new wind energy projects in 2016 represented about $1.5 billion in investment.
• There are now 285 wind farms made up of 6,288 wind turbines operating in Canada, bringing economic development and diversification to well over 100 rural communities through land lease income, property tax payments, ownership revenue and community benefits agreements.
• Canada’s first commercial wind facility, the Cowley Ridge Wind Farm, was decommissioned in 2016, 23 years after it began operations in southern Alberta in 1993. Alberta added no new wind capacity last year, but remains Canada’s third largest wind market with 1,479 MW.

 

President, CanWEA, Robert Hornung said:

 

“More wind energy has been built in Canada in the last 11 years than any other form of electricity generation, and for good reason. Costs for wind energy have fallen dramatically over the past seven years, making wind energy one of Canada’s two most cost-competitive sources of new electricity supply. And unlike natural gas, wind energy is not impacted by carbon prices or commodity price fluctuations, meaning that wind energy will only become more affordable over time. The fact that the vast majority of new wind energy projects built in Canada in 2016 had some form of local ownership demonstrates the value of wind not only as a driver of economic growth, but also as a source of local jobs and revenue in communities right across the country.”

 

We hope our beautiful country will support wind energy at a larger scale, and at the same rate of growth experienced in many other areas of the world.

 

Posted By Sally on February 9, 2017 | 0 Comment

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